Current Edition

current edition

Only in America

Throughout the last year we’ve all had a front row seat to the “sausage making” that’s going on in Washington, D.C. Our current President came into office with a pledge for change that swayed a number of voters – mainly the independent or swing voters who voted on the Democratic ticket for change. 
Another group of voters now exists that questions those choices for those who make the big decisions in Washington. In the West, and in other parts of the nation, this group is not really Democrats or Republicans, but rather frustrated Americans labeled “Tea Partiers.”
The Tea Partiers question the decisions to elect the current President and the long-time Congressional members. Some say the overreach of Newt Gringrich in Congress years ago may have inspired the big government, welfare and warfare conservatism of George W. Bush. If the Tea Party succeeds in winning over the Republican Party in the next few years, they may hurt it in the years ahead, and one has to support their enthusiasm and drive.
Both parties are trying to jump on the Tea Party bandwagon, especially some Republicans, but I really think both parties like to use Tea Party members to staff campaigns and fundraise dollars, but don’t really want them to run the party on a national level. There has always been a conflict between the “professionals” and the “purists” that manage our national political parties, and at times that filters down to the states.
The latest primaries in various states have shown that the long-time Congressional Democrats who are in power and running for office may be in trouble. Nationally, 49 percent of people even say “throw them all out,” which would be a major mistake in Wyoming. I feel our Congressional members have done a great job – they’re just out-voted in Washington.
Polls show that two in five Americans support the Tea Party, but just one in 10 considers themselves members. Almost 85 percent of America’s voters disapprove of Congress’s actions lately, while 70 percent of the Republicans and 14 percent of Democrats support the Tea Party.  Hang on – nationally it’s going to be a wild ride this fall.

Don’t forget to come to Casper later this week for the Wyoming Cattle Industry Summer Convention. Forget about the mud, let the grass grow and come to Casper. On Thursday you will hear the keynote speaker Jim Owen, who wrote the book “Code of the West.” I understand he didn’t get the best reception in Laramie awhile back, so we need to show him a real Wyoming welcome.
Also on Thursday in the Wildlife Committee there will be discussion on the latest Wyoming Game and Fish Department Best Management Practices for Wind Development. This is really important, whether or not you support wind energy or have sage grouse, because of the gross intrusion of private property rights the Game and Fish Commission is forcing on landowners. It is not about wind energy, or endangered species, it’s about private property rights.   You need to be heard. Also, later in the day discussion on last week’s Wind Task Force hearing on eminent domain for collector lines will be discussed. Both issues deserve your presence.
Dennis