Current Edition

current edition

Information Overload

Written by Dennis Sun

As you have read in the Roundup in the last month, there have been numerous stories coming from the winter conventions that we have attended. I believe we have covered eight state conventions or organization meetings in the last month, and those eight conventions have produced a barrel full of information for us to get out to you. We’re not complaining at all, but it will take some time to get all the information out in the weekly edition. We will do the best we can, as this news is timely.  

If we missed covering your convention or meeting, let us know, and we’ll put you on our list for next year.

For those who attended any of the meetings, it is a time to review what happened, and for those who didn’t attend, you can catch up on important information that was brought forth during the meetings. The executives and leaders of the livestock, agricultural and natural resources organizations always do a great job finding the best speakers and presenters at these meetings.  They start planning for next year as this year’s convention winds down.

These meetings are really important to attend if you can. First, it is a time to support the organization you choose to belong to and a time to learn the latest issues. Also important are the presentations to help you as a person in your personal life or your professional career. 

Just visiting with others with the same interests is always a great time to learn what’s new or what is happening out there, and believe me, something is always happening out there in the hills, Cheyenne or Washington, D.C. A lot of this information we don’t like to hear, but we still need to know about it.     

It is always good to hear from our Congressional delegation, Governor and other elected officials, especially the recently elected ones, and to get to know them.  As far as Washington, D.C., I can tell you that issues are beginning to move fast. Just look what happened this past week with the Senate Grazing Improvement Act. It still has to get by the President, but a lame duck Congress can be a dangerous body. One needs to stay in touch.  

Never mind the sage grouse and wolf, the long-eared bat and a toad are making news now. Like the Gunnison sage grouse, it really doesn’t matter the numbers out there, but the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is listing animals because of potential harm from climate change or potential drought circumstances.  How does one combat that?  

Before November rolls around again, you and your family need to decide who goes to what meeting or convention. It doesn’t matter who goes, but someone needs to be there. Our ag, livestock and natural resources organizations need our support, and you all need to be informed to make the best decisions for your businesses. 

Being informed is how one stays ahead of the curve.