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Mud is a Verb

Written by Dennis Sun

     In the last couple of weeks, I’ve had mud described to me in many ways. The first week was pretty positive, and everyone was happy, happy. Then the second week of rain, the tone began to change. Towards the end of that second week, mud was used as a verb, usually with a bit of profanity before or after. The dictionary says a verb is the part of speech that expresses action, existence or occurrence, so I guess they were correct to use mud as a verb. It is not often in Wyoming that we receive moisture in inches in a short time, and that has been the topic of conversation.

Despite delayed cattle brandings, movement of livestock, sheep shearings or fieldwork and plantings, it surely has been a positive experience around most of the state, and the meteorologists say we are not done yet. Most forecasts say a lot of Wyoming should be a little cooler and wetter until August. We’ll take it – just give us a little sunshine to get caught up.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said in their June, July and August forecast, which encompasses corn pollination and the majority of the soybean blooming, pod-setting and pod-filling, feature seasonal temperatures in most crop areas except for the Southern Plains, where the forecast trend is for below normal values. Precipitation is expected to be above normal in the Central and Southern Plains, Deep South, Southeast and in the Rocky Mountains. Other major crop areas are predicted to have near normal rainfall amounts.

So the major theme in summer forecasts is the lack of widespread stress over the U.S. corn and soybean belts. That means above-trend yields, and the grain market reaction to that is generally expected to be bearish. Bearish grain markets are good for livestock producers or feeders, but they aren’t so positive for grain producers. As always, time will tell.

The moisture did help to take our minds off some the negativity coming out of Washington, D.C. these past few months, whether it is endangered species, Waters of the U.S. or more regulations. The need is still there to stay on top of the current issues.

If you can get away for a couple of days during June 4-6, head for Sheridan for the Wyoming Cattle Industry and Trade Show. It doesn’t matter if you are a member of the host organization – the Wyoming Stock Growers Association – or not, at this time of the year, it is where you can find out the latest information on livestock, mainly cattle, public and private lands issues and regulations coming from Washington, D.C. More important, you will get to hear from those who make a lot of the decisions. From our national cattle and other national organizations to state agencies, ag colleges, our Governor, some of our state legislators and our Congressional members and staff, there will be a lot of information. All of these people and more will be there speaking and to visit with. They want to visit with you, so make sure to take advantage of this opportunity.

The theme of this year’s convention is “The Nuts and Bolts of Your Industry.” Sheridan is where it is happening in the state that week, unless you are a Vietnam veteran. All Vietnam veterans should make sure to be in Casper at the end of that week for Wyoming’s Welcome Home event, which will honor those veterans. This is a long overdue celebration, and these brave men deserve the recognition.

Until then, let the grass grow, and we’ll see you in Sheridan.