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Wyoming People

Casper College, Niobrara County 4-H place high in National Western Stock Show judging contests

Denver, Colo. – A number of Wyoming livestock judging teams saw success during the National Western Stock Show. Competing in the event on Jan. 16, both the Casper College Livestock Judging team and the Niobrara County Meats Judging team saw successes. 

4-H team

The Niobrara County senior 4-H Meat Judging team composed of Amber Jensen, Taten Gaukel, McKayle Mosley and Angelina Bannan tallied 2,039 points to capture fourth place honors at the National Western Stock Show (NWSS) 4-H Meat Judging Contest.  

In addition to placing fourth overall, this group was also second in placing of classes, fourth in retail cut identification (ID) and fourth in oral reason presentation. Eleven teams across the country competed in this event and a total of 43 contestants participated.

 Member results

Individually, Jensen paced the home team with a final score of 706 points out of the possible 750. This score tied Jensen for third place overall in the contest, and she received fourth place honors after the tie breaker was applied. She was awarded a $250 Scholarship from the Colorado State University Animal Science Department for this honor. 

In addition, Jensen tied with two other individuals for first place honors in retail cut identification with a perfect score of 300. She received the third place ribbon after the tie-breaker was applied. Jensen was also eighth in oral reasons and 12th in total placings.

Gaukel earned 676 points for 11th place honors, just missing the top 10 by four points. He was recognized for placing 10th in total placings and was 11th in retail cut identification.

Mosley had a final tally of 657 total points to place 14th overall in the competition. Mosley was honored for placing third in total placings and 10th in oral reasons.

Bannan rounded out the top 15 contestants with a score of 640 total points. She was also 13th in retail cut identification.

Preparing

The group practiced at the University of Wyoming in route to this competition. The contest was held at JBS Headquarters in Greeley, Colo., and members had the unique experience of touring and competing in this facility. This group joined the Wyoming delegation attending the Denver 4-H Roundup and enjoyed dinner at the Cheesecake Factory and attended a dance with the entire 4-H Roundup delegation.

This group earned the right to represent Wyoming at the NWSS by placing third at the state contest held in April 2013. Their trip was sponsored by the Teton County 4-H Council, Wyoming Pork Producers, the Niobrara County 4-H Judging Team Fund, which includes numerous county donors, and Casey and Tammie Jensen. 

The team was coached and chaperoned by Extension Educator Tammie Jensen.  

College level

The Casper College Livestock Judging team also spent numerous hours preparing for the event, with workouts starting on Jan. 2.

“We saw around 100-plus classes of cattle, sheep and goats. Coach pushed us but in the end it really paid off.” Emily Hasenauer, Casper College livestock judging team member, declared. 

The team finished third overall, with many individual successes. 

Laddy Trehal was seventh in swine. 

In sheep, Colby Hales was high individual, with Trehal placing eighth and Cade Christensen finishing ninth behind him. The team finished third overall in the sheep portion of the event. 

In cattle, Katie Dodge set the pace by winning cattle by three points and taking second in cattle reasons. Christensen set up at sixth in cattle, and the team took second place in cattle judging

Overall, Trehal took fifth in reasons. 

Additionally, Dodge ended up fifth overall, and Trehal was the second high individual 

Trehal comments, “It was really great to have all that work pay off. Hopefully this is just the beginning of successful spring season.”

As a team, the Casper College Livestock Judging team took third place overall.

Carload judging

The Casper team also competed in the Carload Cattle Judging Contest.

Dylan Freeman says, “It was a challenging contest because there was really good quality to sort. It was also a new experience for me that we won’t ever have the opportunity to do again. I really enjoyed the concept of it because it’s more real life applicable.”  

After the contest, the team ended up ninth overall, and Dylan Freeman ended up sixth high individual. 

Saige Albert, managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup, compiled this article. Send comments on this article to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..