Current Edition

current edition

Wyoming People

Former UW dean publishes another book, delves into fiction literature

Written by Saige Albert
“I’ve been writing novels for 25 years, but I haven’t really taken the time to polish them,” comments Steven Horn. “This particular story was one that I felt strongly about, and I really wanted to get it out.”
    Horn spent 17 years at UW, both as dean of the College of Agriculture and a professor of animal science. Prior to joining the university, he served as the Commissioner of Agriculture in Colorado.
    “Even in my eight to five career, I always found time to write, usually between four and six in the morning,” says Horn of his writing. “Then I would go off to work. It was sort of a stress reliever and a good emotional outlet. It allowed me to express my creative self.”
Publications at UW
    “When I was at UW, I managed to garner a fairly wide readership in a number of publications that the College of Agriculture put out,” he said, noting that he used a lot of venues to tell a story. “I used a type of writing known as faction today. It is a blending between fiction and fact, in order to get my message across to our readership.”
    “I have always enjoyed writing,” he adds. “When I retired three years ago, I decided I was going to spend more time writing.”
    Horn notes, “It doesn’t take as long to write a novel as it does to edit, reedit and rewrite them.”
Another Man’s Life
    His recently published novel, titled Another Man’s Life, is the journey that a Vietnam veteran takes after coming home from war.
    “Vietnam was a really different time in American history,” Horn explains. “When veterans returned home from Vietnam, myself being one of them, we weren’t given ticker tape parades, we weren’t respected, and, as a matter of fact, we were actively discriminated against.”
    He adds that frequently, veterans shed their uniforms as quickly as possible and were quiet about their years of service.
    “The book follows a returning veteran by the name of Eden Cain, and Eden is quite troubled by what he witnessed and what he did in Vietnam,” explains Horn. “He has a generalized vision that he needs to seek forgiveness for the things that he did.”
    Horn adds, “The book is a lot of faction. It points out a lot about the political nature of war and Vietnam.”
    He notes that the journey of Cain provides an emotional roller coaster for the reader, as well as a learning experience. Because of his agriculture background, readers also see a strong connection to ag.
    Horn is currently traveling on a string of book signings and events across Wyoming and the U.S. to promote and sell his book.
Next books
    While Another Man’s Life is hitting the shelves, Horn notes that he has finished writing and is beginning to prepare to publish another book, titled The Pumpkin Eater. This book followed the eugenics movement that swept the country in the 1920s and 30s.
    “They were attempting to manipulate human genetics,” says Horn of the movement. “As in this book, there is quite a bit of agriculture in my next book.”
    He adds that he has three more novels he hopes to publish in the next three or four years.
    Horn’s book is available on amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com and on a variety of electronic devices. Saige Albert is managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..